Our Approach

Our curriculum is based on the following theories:

Freud's Psychosexual Developmental Theory

Freud's Psychosexual Developmental Theory

Freud believed that it was early experiences that played the greatest role in shaping development. According to Freud, personality is largely set in stone by the age of five.
Erikson's Psychosocial Developmental Theory

Erikson's Psychosocial Developmental Theory

Erikson believed that social interaction and experience played decisive roles. Successfully managing the challenges of each stage leads to the emergence of a lifelong psychological virtue.
Behavioral Child Development Theories

Behavioral Child Development Theories

This theory focuses purely on how experience shapes who we are.
Piaget's Cognitive Developmental Theory

Piaget's Cognitive Developmental Theory

This theory also looks at how these thought processes influence the way we understand and interact with the world.
Bowlby's Attachment Theory

Bowlby's Attachment Theory

Bowlby's theory suggested that children are born with an innate need to form attachments.
 Bandura's Social Learning Theory

Bandura's Social Learning Theory

According to social learning theory, behaviors can also be learned through observation and modelling by observing the actions of others, children develop new skills and acquire new information.
Multiple Intelligence

Multiple Intelligence

According to Gardner’s theory, we are all able to know the world through language, logical-mathematical analysis, spatial representation, musical thinking, the use of the body to solve problems or to make things, an understanding of other individuals, and an understanding of ourselves.
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs

Maslow stated that people are motivated to achieve certain needs Our most basic need is for physical survival, and this will be the first thing that motivates our behavior. Once that level is fulfilled the next level up is what motivates us.